Setting up a new care service

 

 

Skills for Care provides practical tools and support to help adult social care organisations in England recruit, develop and lead their workforce. Please note that we are entirely independent of the Care Quality Commission (CQC), who regulate 25,000+ care organisations in England.

If you’re setting up a new care service, our advice and resources around care management and the development of your staff can help these meet the national standards.

Thousands of new adult social care services use our recruitment tools, induction standards, qualifications and apprenticeships to develop their managers, leaders and wider staff team. 

Our funding can keep development costs low and our regular communications ensure services are kept informed of the latest good practice.

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No. The CQC regulate services providing personal care in England. If you’re thinking of opening a new service, consider exactly what care you’ll be providing and contact the CQC to understand their registration process. 

If the CQC advise you that your service does not require registration, obtain this confirmation from them in writing. If you decide at a later point to change the type of care you provide, always contact the CQC before doing so to ensure that you are not providing care that should be regulated.

For services not required to register with the CQC, Skills for Care information and advice should be considered good practice only.

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Yes. Skills for Care believes that to effectively manage a new care service, experience of health or social care is essential. 

Ideally those wishing to become new care managers should be capable and confident to manage their new service, bringing in years of sector and managerial experience. However, Skills for Care cannot decide if someone’s experience is approved by the CQC.

The CQC will ultimately decide if a proposed care manager has demonstrated sufficient experience and ability to manage a service as part of their application and interview process. 

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The current qualification recommended for those wishing to become a registered manager is the Level 5 Diploma in Leadership for Health and Social Care. This vocational qualification usually takes 12-18 months to complete and requires people to be already working within a care management related role due to the workplace assessments that need to be undertaken.

Skills for Care doesn’t deliver the qualification ourselves but our endorsed learning providers do and our Workforce Development Fund can help employers reclaim a contribution to the cost.

If somebody already has the no-longer available Registered Manager Award or Level 4 NVQ in Leadership and Management for Care Services, these are often accepted by the CQC.

The CQC doesn’t publish a list of other qualifications they’ll accept. Registered nurses, social workers or those holding degree level qualifications will need to prove to the CQC in their applications and interviews how their experience and qualifications would enable them to effectively manage the new service.

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Decisions will be made on a case by case basis by the CQC. The CQC doesn’t publish a list of other qualifications they will accept. Registered nurses, social workers or those holding degree level qualifications will need to prove to the CQC in their applications and interviews how their experience and qualifications would enable them to effectively manage the new service.

On occasions those with health or social care experience and qualifications such as a Level 3 Diploma in Health and Social Care could be considered. But once again, it would be down to their ability to demonstrate to the CQC their care management experience and a willingness to undertake the Level 5 Diploma in Leadership for Health and Social Care. 

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Whilst short courses can be used to develop any member of the organisation around specific subject matters, the depth of knowledge and experience needed to effectively manage a new care service cannot be covered in a short course.

The CQC doesn’t publish a list of what they would expect of the owner, directors and other senior managers in a new care service. 

Each role would need to demonstrate to the CQC how their experience and qualifications would ensure that the service would be well-led (e.g. a Finance Director would be expected to demonstrate past experience and associated financial qualifications).

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This will depend on the role and what duties the manager, owner and others in the senior team are undertaking. 

The majority of care managers are involved in developing staff, dealing with escalated issues and the direct delivery of some care in the service – so ensuring their own care training and development is up to date and regularly refreshed is important.

Our Manager Induction Standards and ‘Becoming a Manager’ publication can be used to build confidence. Our guides and performance management toolkit can build wider skills and abilities to develop team working.

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One of the biggest challenges for care services is the recruitment of good staff and retaining them in your organisation.

The majority of good care organisations invest in effective recruitment practices and ensure new staff are ably supported through induction and beyond.  Recruiting people with the right values and motivations to work in care is essential to delivering high standards of care. 

Skills for Care provides a range of resources to help services to recruit the right people and learn how other successful services have addressed this.

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Skills for Care’s workforce intelligence regional reports can help services understand their local area, trends and new opportunities.

Once the business is operational, using our National Minimum Data Set for Social Care (NMDS-SC) system can enable services to compare with other care organisations via the dashboard benchmark data. It can also help to access funding.

It’s very important that care services have good relationships with one another, share learning and work together to share efficiencies. Registered manager networks bring registered managers together to share ideas.

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Skills for Care’s fortnightly enews and quarterly Care magazine are free resources that highlight our latest products and services.  We also host events across the country on a range of subjects each year.

For a deeper level of understanding of the sector, our registered manager membership provides access to exclusive publications, in-depth monthly newsletters and a range of discounts to support your business

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Skills for Care doesn’t advise on the wider considerations when setting up a business. If you’re looking for advice and support to set up a new business, many will turn to business consultants and the Government produces some information that you may find useful.

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