Productivity

Skills for Care has developed a draft model that outlines some of the ways that adult social care organisations can measure and increase workforce productivity.

We’re looking for employers and commissioners to test the model and provide feedback over the next six months (until April 2020).  

Download sample pages of the draft model. 

If you’re interested, please email us telling us who you are and why you want to get involved. In May 2020, we’ll ask you to complete a short survey about how you’ve used it and any suggested changes.

We’ve already tested the model with a small number of providers and commissioners, and due to the positive feedback received so far, we’d like to make the draft model more widely available during this test phase.

We’ll provide support and guidance to help you to get started with the model, and there’s a national steering group for further support if you want to join or contact them.  

About the model

In simple terms, if your workforce is productive, the quality and quantity of their work will improve. Therefore, addressing workforce productivity in your workforce, can help you to deliver high-quality, person-centred care and support.  

The latest reports claim that productivity, generally, has fallen. This is why Skills for Care is working with the sector to explore how we can measure and maximise productivity across the adult social care workforce. 

We’ve developed a model to help employers to measure how productive their workforce is and identify actions to increase it. 

The model is based around four key factors that were identified as having the biggest impact on workforce productivity, through our research in 2018/19. They are:

  • vision, values, culture and supervision
  • inclusive leadership and management
  • learning and development
  • employee health and wellbeing.

Read the research report here.

 

The traditional definition of ‘workforce productivity’ is a metric that’s calculated based on the amount of outputs provided by the process versus the inputs consumed by the process.

This definition is now being extended to focus on how efficiently a system can use resources to achieve its goals, and is taking a more holistic approach by accounting for other factors such as staff training to improve knowledge and skills.

Measuring workforce productivity

Measuring workforce productivity is complex, especially in adult social care, and there are no straightforward ways to measure it.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) recognises that traditional measures of productivity aren’t always relevant for the health and social care sector, and is working on a new methodology to measure productivity in adult social care.

 

The evidence review suggests that there are four key factors that impact on workforce productivity:

  • vision, values, culture and supervision
  • inclusive leadership and management
  • learning and development
  • employee health and wellbeing.

We’ve also considered how to use of digital technology in social care can influence and support productivity.

Workforce productivity diagram Nov 2019

We’ve developed a model to help adult social care employers and commissioners to explore the ways to measure and improve workforce productivity, based on the four factors identified in the evidence review. 

The model gives you a list of questions to help you to analyse how productive your workforce is around each of the four factors. This can help you to think about what’s working well and not so well in your organisation and identify areas for improvement.

It also shares some of the ways that you can increase workforce productivity, and links to practical resources to help.

By using this model as a framework, and engaging with all of the pillars regularly, you can find ways to increase workforce productivity.

Download sample pages of the draft model. 

Get involved

Please email us if you want to test the model, telling us who you are and why you want to get involved.

When you’ve used the model, we’ll ask you to complete a short survey telling us how you’ve used it and any suggested changes.