Person-centred examples of workforce development

Skills for Care and the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group are working together with the Transforming Care programme (workforce) to develop a series of person-centred examples of workforce development. 

We’ve developed 12 'worked examples' that explain what learning and development the workforce needs to support a number of ‘pen pictures’ of people with learning disabilities and/ or autism, who display or at risk of displaying behaviour that challenges.

They explore a range of scenarios of individuals who might be involved in transforming care, to help adult social care commissioners and employers provide the right workforce, with the right skills and knowledge, for people who need care and support.

We know that learning and development is vital to developing a skilled, knowledgeable and confident workforce. If you’re supporting someone who has similar care and support needs, you can use their example as a basis for planning what workforce they need, their learning and development and costs. 

We’d like you to feedback on the draft examples and tell us if anything’s missing or incorrect.

Here's a list of the worked examples. We suggest you focus on one or two examples, but you’re welcome to comment on as many as you want. Please complete this short survey for each example you comment on.

The deadline for feedback is Friday 06 July 2018. We’ll review the feedback and update the examples in July 2018 and hope to launch the final examples in August-September 2018.

 

 

The worked examples aim to cover a range of individuals and situations to reflect people you might support through the transforming care programme.

They explain what ‘workforce’ that person might need, what their learning and development needs are and how much this might cost.

They’ve been developed with people who need care and support, family carers, adult social care employers and commissioners.

These examples can be used by families, employers and commissioners.

If you’re supporting someone who has similar care and support needs, you can use their example as a basis for planning what workforce they need and their training. They also provide a rough cost of that learning.

You can mix and match the examples, drawing information from different examples to create your own plan for the person you’re supporting.

For each individual we:

  • explain what we know about their background
  • explain what their future could look like with the right care and support
  • outline what workforce they need to achieve this positive future
  • outline what skills and knowledge their workforce needs
  • outline how much training would cost to develop this skills and knowledge
  • explain what their future could look like without the right care and support. 

Here’s a list of the worked examples

They're currently in a draft version, and we’d like to know what you think. Please complete this short survey by Friday 06 July 2018.

Please also think about whether they cover the wide range of people you might support through transforming care, and let us know if there are any situations missing.

We’d also like to know how you think they can be used – are they fit for purpose and would you find them useful?

We’ll review the feedback and update the examples in July 2018 and hope to launch the final examples in August-September 2018.

Carol

Carol is 75 years old and is of Chinese origin. She has a moderate learning disability and people think she may be autistic but she has no formal diagnosis. 

In the past she’s stayed in various assessment and treatment units and hospitals. She’s been living in a supported living setting for eight years.

Recently she’s had health issues and has exhibited behaviour which challenges services. However, she doesn’t like seeing a doctor about it.  

Download the worked example here.

Daniel

Daniel is 25 years old. He likes to look good, enjoys football, training at the gym and drinking. He’s interested in motor mechanics and hanging about with ‘the lads’.

He’s currently in a secure hospital under section 37-41 (hospital order given by the crown court). He got into trouble with the police for burglary, then this escalated to aggravated burglary and rape. He was identified in prison as vulnerable and moved to a secure hospital.

Daniel has gone through the sex offenders programme and is now ready for discharge.

Download the worked example here.

Hero and Sweet

Hero and Sweet are a couple in their twenties and have two children aged under 6. They’ve enjoyed coach holidays in the past and have been active members of a local advocacy group.

Hero and Sweet both have a mild learning disability and Sweet is experiencing post natal depression.

They get some hours of support a week with household tasks, and Sweet’s mum helps them too, but children’s services have concerns about their children’s welfare.

Download the worked example here.

Laura

Laura is 18 years old. She has type one diabetes, autism and profound, multiple and severe learning disability.

She has lived at home with her mum and dad and two sisters, but now she’s in hospital after her residential care placement broke down.

Download the worked example here.

Wilf

Wilf is 72 years old. He has a mild learning disability and possible dementia. He has a background of fire setting and allegations of sexual assault, as well alleging he’s been assaulted himself.

He’s lived in a specialist learning disability inpatient services for six years. In the past he’s lived in lots of places including hospital admissions.

His responsible clinician thinks he’s had all the treatment he can benefit from and would like him to move into supported living. However his niece Debbie feels he’s safer in hospital.

Download the worked example here.

Dean

Dean is 15 years old. He has a mild learning disability, epilepsy and cerebral palsy. He loves technology

He currently lives with his mum and dad who are worried and ‘can’t control him any more’. They’re concerned that he might be involved in ‘mate’ crime or petty crimes, and the police have brought him home several times for being drunk in public.

Download the worked example here.

Doris

Doris is 55 years old. She has profound learning disabilities and uses a manual wheelchair to support her mobility.

She’s lived in a variety of learning disability hospitals, including 15 years in a North East hospital which is 200 miles from her home town in the Midlands.

After the hospital shut down, she lived in a residential home for five years. Her person-centred plan included her wish to have a pet dog and to go to bingo – she has sometimes gone to bingo but the home can’t have pets. After a few years she began to display behaviours which challenge and was admitted as an emergency to a mental health assessment and treatment units. Here she was diagnosed as having depression and dementia – she’s still there two years later.

Download the worked example here.

Ellie

Ellie is 21 years old. She has a mild learning disability and history of familial sexual behaviour and abuse.

Soon after starting secondary school she developed anxiety and stopped going to school. Ellie has a YouTube channel where she vlogs about fashion and beauty – at the moment she isn’t allowed to upload any new vlogs.

Ellie is currently in an inpatient setting following her stabbing her aunt at home and exposing herself in public.

Download the worked example here.

Francois

Francois is 32 years old. He has mental ill-health, depression, possible ADHD and a history of alcohol and substance misuse.

Currently he gets two hours a week support to help with bills and housework

He lives in a flat but his landlord has given him notice of impending eviction as “the flat is filthy and other tenants in the building have complained about frequent ‘visitors’”.

He’s under a M.O.J. restriction as he had been arrested and convicted of assault while under the influence of substances and alcohol. 

There’s difficulty finding suitable accommodation due to his offending history and he’s been transferred to hospital for treatment under a hospital order from prison.

Download the worked example here. 

Joe

Joe is 12 years old. He has a learning disability, autism and sensory challenges. His behaviour can post a risk to himself.

He’s currently in a 52 week long school programme which is a long way from his home.

Download the worked example here.

Jake

Jake is 28 years old. He has a moderate learning disability and poorly controlled diabetes and epilepsy.

He lives in a supported living setting with five other people. His support provider feels he’s at risk of admission to in-patient services as his behaviour can be too challenging.

Download the worked example here.

Paul and Doreen

Paul is 50 years old and has autism with no diagnosis of a learning disability. This can sometimes affect his temper and mental health.

His Mum, Doreen, supports him at home but her health is deteriorating and she’s worried about how Paul will cope without her support.

She feels that he wouldn’t be able to live by himself without support but would get angry if he had to live with others.

Download the worked example here.