Examples of workforce development

Skills for Care and the Voluntary Organisations Disability Group have developed a series of 'worked examples' of workforce development. 

They're based on real-life scenarios of people with a learning disability and/or autistic people, who display or are at risk of displaying behaviours which challenge. They explain what workforce that individual needs, what skills and knowledge the workforce needs, and how much this training would cost. 

They're for adult social care commissioners and providers, to help you identify learning and development needs and plan support. You can mix and match the examples and draw information from different examples to create your own plan for the person you’re supporting. You can use this template to do this. 

  • If you support someone who has similar care and support needs you can use the examples as a guide or template to plan their workforce and commission learning and development. You could use the worked example to inform specifications or contracts for support services, or make a ‘business case’ for investing in learning and development.

  • If you’re thinking about a population of people in a specific area, you can explore how many people in your area have similar care and support needs to the worked examples, and scale them up to strategically plan and develop the workforce. 

Download our 'How to use the worked examples' overview. 

Download the worked examples 

We've listed the examples in age order. *Please note, we're still testing them with the sector. Please use the online PDF to ensure you have the most up to date version. Email us if you have any feedback.*

  • Joe - Joe's 12 years old. He has a learning disability, autism and sensory challenges. His behaviour can post a risk to himself. He’s currently in a 52 week long school programme which is a long way from his home. Download his worked example here. 

  • Dean - Dean's 15 years old and has a mild learning disability, epilepsy and cerebral palsy. He lives with his parents who are worried and 'can't control him any more'. They're concerned he might be involved in 'mate' or 'petty' crime. Download his worked example here. 

  • Laura - Laura's 21 years old and has type one diabetes, autism and profound, multiple and severe learning disability. She lives in a specialist residential home but is at risk of being admitted to hospital if this breaks down. Download her worked example here

  • Ellie - Ellie's 21 and has Asperger's. She has a mild learning disability and history of familial sexual behaviour and abuse. Soon after starting secondary school she developed anxiety and stopped going to school. Ellie is currently in an inpatient setting following her stabbing her aunt at home and exposing herself in public. Download her worked example here

  • Daniel - Daniel's currently in a secure hospital under section 37-41 (hospital order given by the crown court). He got into trouble with the police for burglary, then this escalated to aggravated burglary and rape. He was identified in prison as vulnerable and moved to a secure hospital. Daniel has gone through the sex offender’s programme and is now ready for discharge. Download his worked example here.

  • Hero and Sweet - They are a couple in their twenties and have two children aged under 6. They both have a mild learning disability and Sweet is experiencing post natal depression. They get some hours of support a week with household tasks, and Sweet’s mum helps them too, but children’s services have concerns about their children’s welfare. Download their worked example here. 

  • Jake - Jake's 28 years old. He has a moderate learning disability and poorly controlled diabetes and epilepsy. He lives in a supported living setting with five other people. His support provider feels he’s at risk of admission to in-patient services as his behaviour can be too challenging. Download his worked example here.  

  • Francois - Francois's 32 years old and has mental ill-health, depression, possible ADHD and a history of alcohol and substance misuse. Currently he gets two hours a week support to help with bills and housework

    He lives in a flat but his landlord has given him notice of impending eviction as “the flat is filthy and other tenants in the building have complained about frequent ‘visitors’" He’s under a M.O.J. restriction as he had been arrested and convicted of assault while under the influence of substances and alcohol. Download his worked example here. 

  • Paul and Doreen - Paul's 50 years old and has autism with no diagnosis of a learning disability, which can sometimes affect his temper and mental health. His Mum, Doreen, supports him at home but her health is deteriorating and she’s worried about how Paul will cope without her. Download their worked example here. 

  • Doris - Doris is 55 years old and has a learning disability and doesn't use verbal speech. She's lived in a variety of learning disability hospitals before moving into a residential care home. When this broke down, she was admitted as an emergency to a mental health ATU where she's been diagnosed with depression and dementia. Download her worked example here. 

  • Wilf - Wilf's 72 years old and has a mild learning disability and possible dementia. He has been involved in incidents of arson and has lived in a specialist learning disability inpatient services for six years. His responsible clinician thinks he’s had all the treatment he can benefit from and would like him to move into supported living. However his niece Debbie feels he’s safer in hospital. Download his worked example here. 

  • Carol - Carol's 75 years old and is of Chinese origin. She has a moderate learning disability and people think she may be autistic but she has no formal diagnosis. In the past she’s stayed in various assessment and treatment units and hospitals. She’s been living in a supported living setting for eight years. Recently she’s had health issues and has exhibited behaviour which challenges services. However, she doesn’t like seeing a doctor about it. Download her worked example here.

The worked examples aim to cover a range of individuals and situations to reflect people you might support through the transforming care programme.

They explain what ‘workforce’ that person might need, what their learning and development needs are and how much this might cost.

They’ve been developed with people who need care and support, family carers, adult social care employers and commissioners.

These examples can be used by families, employers and commissioners.

  • If you support someone who has similar care and support needs you can use the examples as a guide or template to plan their workforce and commission learning and development. You could use the worked example to inform specifications or contracts for support services, or make a ‘business case’ for investing in learning and development.
  • If you’re thinking about a population of people in a specific area, you can explore how many people in your area have similar care and support needs to the worked examples, and scale them up to strategically plan and develop the workforce. 

You can mix and match the examples, drawing information from different examples to create your own plan for the person you’re supporting.

For each individual we:

  • explain what we know about their background
  • explain what their future could look like with the right care and support
  • outline what workforce they need to achieve this positive future
  • outline what skills and knowledge their workforce needs
  • outline how much training would cost to develop this skills and knowledge
  • explain what their future could look like without the right care and support.